Róisín Machine – Wikipedia

Róisín Machine is the fifth alone studio album by irish singer Róisín Murphy, released on 2 October 2020 by broke Records. Róisín Machine received critical acclaim upon its unblock, ranking among the best albums of 2020 by several publications. Commercially, Róisín Machine became Murphy ‘s highest-charting album in both Ireland and the UK, debuting at number 5 and issue 14 respectively. A remix album, Crooked Machine, was released on 30 April 2021 .

background [edit ]

According to Murphy, work began on what would become Róisín Machine a ten prior to its release, [ 3 ] during which time she maintained an active presence in the industry, undertaking respective releases including the italian linguistic process EP Mi Senti ( 2014 ), studio albums Hairless Toys ( 2015 ) and Take Her Up to Monto ( 2016 ), and a series of EPs with Maurice Fulton in 2018. however, the impulse for the album came as broke Records laminitis Damian Harris returned to the label as creative conductor in 2019. [ 4 ] Harris helped drive the project ahead, persuading Murphy to sign a record contract with Skint Records and its rear label BMG, although Murphy negotiated the condense to be a one-album cover as she “ wanted to keep [ her ] options open ”. [ 3 ]

Recording and product [edit ]

“ simulation ” was the first chase on the record to be created, produced by her long-run collaborator Richard Barratt ( besides known as DJ Parrot and Crooked Man ), and released through permanent Vacation in 2012. [ 4 ] [ 5 ] In 2015, she released “ jealousy ” through Crosstown Rebels, besides produced by Barratt. [ 4 ] [ 6 ] Both were released as standalone tracks and did not appear on her subsequent studio album, Hairless Toys ( 2015 ), or its successor, Take Her Up to Monto ( 2016 ). [ 7 ] Following these releases, Murphy continued to collaborate intermittently with Barratt, working in “ drips and olive drab over the years ”, [ 3 ] on projects that would subsequently develop into a full studio album. [ 6 ] Although Murphy intended the tracks to be function of an album, she and Barratt parked the theme for some time. [ 8 ] Murphy then released a string of EPs in collaboration with Maurice Fulton in 2018, opting to release a third individual with Barratt, “ incapable ”, once her project with Fulton was complete. [ 8 ] “ incapable ” was released via Bitter End in 2019, with the unmarried billed as another one-off passing. [ 4 ] [ 9 ] Speaking to the Sheffield Star, Murphy said : “ You just get a act of a fusillade every now and again. It ‘s an insatiate machine, nowadays, is n’t it—content, and music. You ‘ve just got to keep feeding it, and it ‘s barely about accomplishable with one-off singles. ” [ 9 ] Murphy had written “ incapable ” in 2010, following her separation from artist Simon Henwood, nine months after their daughter was born. [ 6 ] Barratt and Murphy would typically work remotely while producing and recording the album ; Barratt would put the music in concert at his studio in Sheffield, sending the path on to Murphy to record her vocals at her dwelling in London and send them back. [ 10 ] According to Barratt, he used Logic 5.5 “ from 1998 ” as his digital audio workstation for the entire record. [ 10 ] Describing her home recording apparatus, Murphy said : “ It ‘s not quite a studio. “ I ‘ve got an Ableton swindle at my house in London, which is strictly for recording and working on vocals [ … ] I actually fair need a laptop, an interface and a mic. ” [ 10 ] On occasions, Barratt would request Murphy re-record her vocals in Sheffield to ensure a better take, saying : “ Unless you ‘re recording very inner and guarded vocals, it ‘s difficult for any singer to record themselves at dwelling. You ‘re having to piss about with a computer and thinking about levels, when all you should be doing is singing. sometimes, it ‘s good to do stuff in a studio with a booth and an engineer. ” [ 10 ] Finishing the album ‘s record during the COVID-19 pandemic, Murphy described the have of travelling from London to Sheffield during lockdown restrictions as “ creepy ”, recalling “ walking down deserted streets and being wholly freaked out. ” [ 10 ] As a resultant role, she felt “ sure some of that acute feel found its way into the songs. ” [ 10 ]

Music and lyrics [edit ]

A deviation from the art dad, trip hop, and bossa nova influences of her previous works, Róisín Machine marks a turn into dance -oriented golf club music. The album features influences of disco, nu-disco, house, electropop, flinch, post-disco, electro – R & B, Chicago house, dub, rickety pop music, and minimal flinch. [ 11 ] [ 7 ] The album ‘s songs reject traditional pop structures in a manner alike to vintage disco 12-inch singles. [ 12 ]

entitle and artwork [edit ]

Murphy titled the album Róisín Machine to reflect her ongoing creative end product, saying : “ I ‘m constantly up to something, I ‘ve been directing video and art-directing for years. The album is called Róisín Machine because I am a car. I never stop. ” [ 13 ] Vogue writer Liam Hess described the album title as “ a reference to the indefatigable exploit Murphy has invested in maintaining her career as labels have come and gone. Learning to reconcile her endless curiosity and urge to experiment with her doggedness as a businessperson has been no beggarly feat. ” [ 14 ] Elaborating in an interview with the Official Charts Company, Murphy address of the difficulties in releasing a record independently, with audiences expecting a regular menstruation of content, saying : “ That ‘s where the car comes in. The Róisín Machine is in full consequence on those levels because I do all the conduct and the visuals. I have a identical fecund output with or without being on a major label, which I think speaks well for me in this day and senesce. ” [ 3 ] The album cover charge photography was shot by Adrian Samson, with the artwork created by portuguese graphic designer Bráulio Amado. [ 15 ] Murphy styled all of the garments worn in the album artwork by herself, most of which were pulled from her own manner archive. [ 14 ] According to Murphy, she and Amado wanted to create a plan that was redolent of a fanzine – “ like it was Xeroxed “ – rather than a luxury product. [ 16 ] Murphy supplied Amado with reference images of Siouxsie Sioux, pop-punk and post-punk women, deoxyadenosine monophosphate well as vintage S & M and 70s and 80s italian pornography. talk of the creative guidance of the artwork, Murphy said : “ I kind of went a little act against the music in the sense that it didn ’ t go full-on disco queen, I went a morsel more insurgent. ” [ 16 ]

Release and promotion [edit ]

potato announced the approaching release of Róisín Machine on 31 July 2020, with pre-orders made available that day. [ 17 ] [ 18 ] Originally planned for let go of on 25 September, Murphy announced in mid-september that due to manufacturing delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Róisín Machine would alternatively be released one workweek by and by, on 2 October. [ 19 ] physically, Róisín Machine was produced in cadmium and vinyl formats. [ 20 ] In addition to the standard vinyl crusade, a diaphanous blasphemous vinyl limited to 2,500 copies was besides produced, retailing entirely on Murphy ‘s web site. [ 21 ] The limited edition vinyl box besides included a particularly produced zine and signed photograph. [ 22 ] A second limited edition pressing featuring reworked cover charge art, limited to 5,000 copies of clear diaphanous vinyl, was released on 11 December 2020. [ 23 ] As a link with National Album Day 2021, Róisín Machine was reissued with a blue and bolshevik splatter-effect vinyl, [ 24 ] limited to 4,000 copies. [ 25 ] In promotion of the album, Murphy appeared on The Graham Norton Show on 2 October, performing “ Murphy ‘s Law ”. [ 26 ] Industry title Music Week noted her appearance on the chat show amid record labels vying for boil down music performance slots, due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on television program. [ 26 ] Murphy besides performed “ incapable ” on Jools’ Annual Hootenanny on New Year ‘s Eve 2020, in a be interpretation with the Rhythm and Blues Orchestra. [ 27 ]

critical reception [edit ]

Róisín Machine has received critical applaud and presently holds a leaden average score of 86 out of 100 at review collector Metacritic, based on 13 reviews. [ 29 ] The Irish Times critic Lauren Murphy called the album “ disco dynamite ”, [ 36 ] while Metro reviewer David Bennun described the album as “ the mother lode, the horn of plenty, the phantasmagoria, of fondly reconditioned disco toss off ”. [ 39 ] In a positive review, The Arts Desk referred to the album as a “ melodious return for Róisín Murphy, both geographically and figuratively, ” [ 31 ] noting the album ‘s output with her longtime confederate, Sheffield based Richard Barratt, whom Murphy foremost met while beginning her career as a musician in the city. Writing for The Guardian, Alexis Petridis described Róisín Machine as “ a sharper, more focus album than 2016 ‘s Take Her Up to Monto ; one which reins in some, but not all, of its author ‘s eccentricities [ … ] surely, it allows Murphy ‘s talents to shine far more clearly than its sprawl harbinger. ” [ 34 ] Gianni Borrelli of Australia ‘s 7NEWS praised the album for “ pushing past the standard four-on-the-floor fare ” on tracks “ Game Changer ” and “ Kingdom of Ends ”, calling Róisín Machine “ a career best of shimmering nu-disco she ‘s been perfecting for the last decade ”. [ 40 ]

year-end lists [edit ]

commercial performance [edit ]

In Murphy ‘s native Ireland, Róisín Machine debuted at number 5 on the Irish Albums Chart, becoming her highest-charting album as both a solo artist or as part of Moloko. [ 55 ] In the UK, Róisín Machine entered the Official Album Charts at number 14 with 4,724 units sold, [ 56 ] [ 4 ] securing Murphy her highest-charting album as a solo artist, [ 56 ] surpassing 2015 ‘s Hairless Toys, which peaked at number 19. [ 57 ] It besides became her highest charting album in both Australia and Germany, charting at count 53 and 24 respectively .

track list [edit ]

All tracks are written by Róisín Murphy and Richard Barratt, except where noted .

Róisín Machine track listing
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “Simulation”
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
  • Michael Ward
8:29
2. “Kingdom of Ends”   6:10
3. “Something More”
  • Amy Douglas
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
6:49
4. “Shellfish Mademoiselle”   4:17
5. “Incapable”   3:45
6. “We Got Together”   5:10
7. “Murphy’s Law”
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
  • Dean Honer
  • Ward
6:21
8. “Game Changer”   4:14
9. “Narcissus”   4:55
10. “Jealousy”   4:13
sum duration : 54:27
Deluxe edition bonus tracks
No. Title Writer(s) Length
11. “Incapable” ( Extended Mix )   8:25
12. “Narcissus” ( Extended Mix )   7:40
13. “Murphy’s Law” ( Extended Mix )
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
  • Honer
  • Ward
8:00
14. “Something More” ( Extended Mix )
  • Douglas
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
7:56
15. “Simulation” ( Extended Mix )
  • Murphy
  • Barratt
  • Ward
11:37
16. “Jealousy” ( Extended Mix )

  11:39
total distance : 109:47

Notes

  • “Jealousy” contains uncredited elements of “New York’s Movin'”, written by Osborne Hunter and Steve Boston, and performed by Ahzz.

Personnel [edit ]

Credits are adapted from the lining notes of Róisín Machine. [ 15 ]

Production
  • Richard Barratt – producer
  • David Lewin – engineer
  • Randy Merrill – mastering
  • Dean Honer – additional engineering (track 7)
  • Eric Kupper – mixdown (tracks 1, 10)
  • Bráulio Amado – artwork
  • Adrian Samson – photography
Musicians
  • Róisín Murphy – lead vocals (all tracks)
  • Rhianna Kenny – backing vocals (tracks 2–4, 7–8)
  • Michael Ward – backing vocals (track 7)
  • Nesreen Shah – backing vocals (track 7)
  • Philly Smith – backing vocals (track 7)
  • Eddie Steven – string arrangement (track 9)
  • Sarah Bowler – violin (track 9)
  • Debbie White – violin (track 9)
  • Stephanie Benedetti – violin (track 9)
  • Henry Salmon – violin (track 9)

Charts [edit ]

Release history [edit ]

Release dates and formats for Róisín Machine
Region Date Format Editions Label Ref.
Various 2 October 2020
  • Digital download
  • streaming
  • Standard
  • deluxe
  • Skint Records
  • BMG
[70]
  • CD
  • LP
Standard [71]

Crooked Machine [edit ]

Crooked Machine
Róisín Murphy - Crooked Machine (official remix album cover).png
Remix album by Róisín Murphy
Released 30 April 2021 ( )
Genre
  • House
  • techno
Length

58

:

45

Label
  • Skint
  • BMG
Producer Richard Barratt
Róisín Murphy chronology
Róisín Machine
(2020)
Crooked Machine
(2021)
Singles from Crooked Machine
  1. Released : 7 April 2021

The accompanying remix album Crooked Machine was released digitally on 30 April 2021, with a vinyl release slated for 12 June as separate of Record Store Day 2021. [ 72 ]

background [edit ]

Crooked Machine features nine remixes of songs from Róisín Machine, created by Murphy ‘s frequent collaborator, Crooked Man ( besides known as DJ Parrot or Richard Barratt ). About their partnership and the remix album, Murphy stated

parrot does n’t try to be ‘cool ‘, I reckon that ‘s the last thing on his mind. He makes music with a real sense of responsibility to the craft. He just can not make rubbish music, he ’ five hundred be excessively ashamed. so everything he is and everything he has learned, is put into everything he does. I think Crooked Machine is one of his greatest achievements so far. I left him and Fat Dave to their own devices on this and they have outdone themselves ! I absolutely love it ! ! I think I prefer it to the original album, slenderly less me and all the more ‘cool ‘ for it ! [ 73 ]

The remix album ‘s sound, according to a press release is as “ If Róisín Machine was the big night out…this is the afterparty where things get dark and more distorted ”. [ 74 ]

critical reception [edit ]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[75]
Albumism 5/5 stars[76]
Pitchfork 7.7/10[77]

Shaad D’Souza of Pitchfork gave Crooked Machine a 7.7 score, commending it for “ portray [ ing ] a raw embodiment of the Róisín Machine ethos – a testament to the transformative power of the dancefloor, remodel in shades of house and techno raw dark and a touch more modern than its harbinger ”, besides praising Barratt ‘s reworkings for “ foreground [ ing ] the lastingness and versatility of Murphy ‘s artwork – placing her in context both more mod and more abstract, and still letting her come out on top ”. [ 78 ]

racetrack list [edit ]

All tracks are written by Richard Barratt and Róisín Murphy, except where noted. All tracks are produced by Richard Barratt [ 79 ] .

Crooked Machine track listing
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “Kingdom of Machines”   6:28
2. “Echo Returns”   5:55
3. “Capable Rhythm”   6:06
4. “Assimilation”
  • Michael Ward
  • Barratt
  • Murphy
6:54
5. “Crooked Madame”   7:15
6. “Less Is More”
  • Amy Douglas
  • Barratt
  • Murphy
6:41
7. “Name Changer”   5:49
8. “We Are the Law”
  • Dean Honer
  • Ward
  • Barratt
  • Murphy
6:12
9. “Hardcore Jealousy”   7:25
sum length : 58:45

References [edit ]

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